French Revolutions: Cycling the Tour de France

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Fallen Angel William Fotheringham. Continental Drifter Tim Moore.

French Revolutions: Cycling the Tour de France - Tim Moore - Google Книги

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Tour de Francis

Cycling the Tour de France by Tim Moore. Cycling the Tour de France 3. Not only is it the world's largest and most watched sporting event, but also the most fearsome physical challenge ever conceived by man, demanding every last ounce of will and strength, every last drop of blood, sweat, and tears. If ever there was an athletic exploit specifically not for the faint of heart and feeble of limb, this is it. So you might ask, what is Tim Moore Not only is it the world's largest and most watched sporting event, but also the most fearsome physical challenge ever conceived by man, demanding every last ounce of will and strength, every last drop of blood, sweat, and tears.

So you might ask, what is Tim Moore doing cycling it? An extremely good question. Ignoring the pleading dictates of reason and common sense, Moore determined to tackle the Tour de France, all 2, miles of it, in the weeks before the professionals entered the stage. This decision was one he would regret for nearly its entire length. But readers--those who now know Moore's name deserves to be mentioned in the same breath as Bill Bryson and Calvin Trillin--will feel otherwise.

They are in for a side-splitting treat. French Revolutions gives us a hilariously unforgettable account of Moore's attempt to conquer the Tour de France. He cheats when he can, pops the occasional hayfever pill for an ephedrine rush a fine old Tour tradition , sips cheap wine from his water bottle, and occasionally weeps on the phone to his wife. But along the way he gives readers an account of the race's colorful history and greatest heroes: Fans of the Tour de France will learn why the yellow jersey is yellow, and how cyclists learned to save precious seconds a race that lasts for three weeks is all about split seconds by relieving themselves en route.

And if that isn't enough, his account of a rural France tarting itself up for its moment in the spotlight leaves popular quaint descriptions of small towns in Provence in the proverbial dust. If you either love or hate the French, or both, you'll want to travel along with Time Moore. French Revolutions is Tim Moore's funniest book to date.

It is also one of the funniest sports books ever written. Paperback , pages. Published June 1st by St. Martin's Griffin first published May 14th To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about French Revolutions , please sign up. The title is a pun -- bike wheels go round, revolutions, in …more This book is about a guy cycling the Tour de France bike race route through France. The title is a pun -- bike wheels go round, revolutions, in France.

It's quite good, especially if you either are a cyclist or like travel books. See 1 question about French Revolutions…. Lists with This Book. Bettie and the BBC. Honestly, if you are thinking of reading this book about one British man's attempt to do the Tour de France route, get the audio.

Just kept laughing so hard. Hear about Mars bars, mountains, and ass cream! Listen in amazement as he recounts the struggle of putting the bike together. Shake your head as he tries to find drug aid! And there is a bunch of Tour de France history as well Note, though, this was written before Armstrong's confession. I'm not quite sure how you prepare for biking km of the Tour de France route by running a couple of times and heading out on the new bike a couple of times. But somehow Moore pulled it off.

And he doesn't pull any punches with the descriptions.

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Wanna know how you'd feel after biking just over km in a day, arrive in the town of Troyes in the night only to find there's not a hotel room in the entire town, but your wife, calling to France from England for you found one in a city km a I'm not quite sure how you prepare for biking km of the Tour de France route by running a couple of times and heading out on the new bike a couple of times. Wanna know how you'd feel after biking just over km in a day, arrive in the town of Troyes in the night only to find there's not a hotel room in the entire town, but your wife, calling to France from England for you found one in a city km away, so off you go again on your bike, finding your feeble bike lights don't cut it in the rural landscape?

The trees rose up about me and blocked off the moon; if the roads hadn't been almost dead straight I'd never have made it. I could barely make out the fingerposts at all and, when I did, the only way to read them was to shin up the pole and hold my flashing light an inch away from the lettering. I ran over something pulpy. There were other sounds. I hadn't seen any signs of life for an eon.

The suggestion that somewhere in this wooded wilderness lay a Holiday Inn was an outrage against logic. Wolves--certainly; vagrant lunatics--odds-on; a solitary cleated foot emerging from recently disturbed soil--well, the night was young. Chapeau, Tim Moore, Chapeau, indeed! Aug 08, MisterFweem rated it it was amazing. Travel writing is ubiquitous, but good travel writing is hard to come by. Fortunately, Tim Moore's "French Revolutions" fits in the latter category.

Moore is a crazy Brit who decides he's going to cycle the Tour de France route in about a month before the tour and discovers that, at the end of all things, he was indeed mad to undertake such an adventure. He fails in some of his goals, triumphing in others. He meets genuinely good people and a bunch of pratts. His encounters with "official" F Travel writing is ubiquitous, but good travel writing is hard to come by. His encounters with "official" France and the "paysan" France mirror the encounters I had while I lived in the country for nearly two years: Officials are very official and the paysans are, for the most part, pretty decent.

But back to the book.

French Revolutions: Cycling the Tour de France

Moore follows the best tenet I've ever observed of travel writing: It's about the travel, not the author. Yes, the author has to insert himself or herself into the book as the narrator, but there are some authors who can't resist putting themselves in as characters so often they get in the way of the writing.

John Steinbeck's "Travels with Charley" comes to mind in this category. Moore, on the other hand, manages to keep the narrative going without inserting his writerly self in at every little hairpin turn in the road. The book brought back a lot of memories. Not that I've ever cycled the Tour de France route, but I have done plenty of cycling in the French countryside and, for two days, was trapped in my apartment because not only was the city I was living in at the time a "ville d'etape," but also the neighborhood where I lived was also the epicenter of the race's arrival and departure.

I have an audio recording of the event somewhere. I'm going to have to dig it out now and listen to it again. Thank goodness I read this book. Many years ago I circum-cycled Tasmania and, on completion, thought about what my next challenge would be. Unsurprisingly due to what must have been lactic acid-affected cognition I also hit upon the idea of cycling the Tour de France route. And though I subsequently recognised it as a silly idea or rather, far too hard , now I really, really don't have to do it 'cause this author has done it for me. Containing some fascinating anecdotes of Tour history, and pr Thank goodness I read this book.

Containing some fascinating anecdotes of Tour history, and providing a great comparison between elite and recreational sportsman, Tim Moore barely in the latter category pilots his way, as best he can, through the French, Swiss and German countryside mostly atop his bicycle. Along the way he manically, obstinately and hilariously butts heads against those who cross his path - but reserves his worst words for himself. Funny as the journey may be - for the reader at least - he arguably doesn't achieve his goal. In one regard though, he does have his name on par, for a moment, with the supermen who make the Tour their living.

Aug 15, Mary rated it really liked it Shelves: A rank amateur rides the route of the Tour de France, with painful and hilarious results. Very funny, lots of Tour history.

4. 'French Revolutions: Cycling the Tour de France,' by Tim Moore

Think Bill Bryson with a bicycle. The book started off great. It was funny and the main character seems a little dumb for trying a challenge like this. Unfortunately, this is the funniest part of the book. Only very rarely are there any other funny pays in the book. Quite a disappointment as the cover of the book is filled with blurbs about how hilarious the book is.

French Revolutions : Cycling the Tour de France

There is a sort of self-deprecating 'humor' going on throughout the rest of the book though. However it's constantly used and becomes tiring because of this. Someth The book started off great. Something else that bothered me, was that the writer was trying to show of his knowledge of big words. At least, so it seemed. There are quite a few of these used throughout the book, so many in fact that at some point it started to annoy me and I started wondering if regular words were beneath the writer.

Some of the flashbacks seem to have no clear purpose except for confusion, or filling space. There are a few things however that I did like about the book. It was very recognizable, whether you're big on sports or not. It's easy to realize what's happening and why, which leads to the next pro of the book: It seems to be quite accurate and is detailed as well. If you're very squeamish, you might want to avoid those scenes.


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All in all, I didn't really enjoy the book. I had to force myself to keep reading. Maybe the type of humor used want really my thing. Whatever it was, it did not make me laugh out loud as promised. Jun 24, Esther rated it did not like it. My brother, an avid cyclist, passed this on to me.

Well I thought this was utter crap. Firstly, at the beginning he talks about not having done much cycling, not being fit, does hardly any training, nearly falls over trying to get used to clip in pedals etc. Yet another in a long line of delusional males, or is this ineptitude supposed to engender sympathy or humor in the reader? It just irritated me. Then he gets started on riding the tour and is suddenly clocking up s of kilometers and make My brother, an avid cyclist, passed this on to me.

So there is a hefty smell of bullshit surrounding his attempts at playing the stupid amateur. And if he's playing this for laughs, it was really shit. Not funny at all.

In fact he just comes across as a gigantic cock. Rude and practically xenophobic to the poor French people he encounters. Let's be absolutely clear — this is not a "travel book". It is not full of lush descriptions of pretty towns and villages. There are very few romantic musings on the French way of life. And it is definitely not an affectionate tribute to France or its people.

This is a book for cyclists and Tour enthusiasts, not travellers. It's well written, descriptive, and funny, and it's clearly written by someone who has much affection for "Le Tour" and its "histoire". But if you're after a book that combin Let's be absolutely clear — this is not a "travel book". But if you're after a book that combines a re-creation of the race with an affection for the country, try "One Day Ahead" by Richard Grady. May 30, Sean O'Hare rated it really liked it.

Yeah, it is about the Tour de France. Let's just get that out there. It's also about France and cycling and traveling and a mad person doing a mad thing. It's a really funny story true about a guy who decided that he probably didn't have traditional athletic skills but figured he could ride a bike so why not ride one around France in the month before the Tour de France and write about it.

That's it, so if the idea of an out of shape Englishman hopping on a bike and trying to ride the course of Yeah, it is about the Tour de France. That's it, so if the idea of an out of shape Englishman hopping on a bike and trying to ride the course of the most grueling athletic event of the year doesn't appeal to you, then this is not for you. Of course, I can't understand why someone wouldn't be into that Aug 17, Steve Kimmins rated it really liked it Shelves: I got this book a few years ago, and had a quick reread as the Tour de France progressed this year.

I love everything about the Tour incidentally. The spectacle, the athleticism of the riders toughest atheletes in the world! And of course I love cycling too. In this book a keen amateur rider decides to do pretty much all of one years Tour I got this book a few years ago, and had a quick reread as the Tour de France progressed this year. In this book a keen amateur rider decides to do pretty much all of one years Tour course.

At this own pace and staying where he can find.

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